Does anyone know if epoxy can be used for
#6
drinking cups?


I have used casting epoxy for vases to waterproof them but nothing says NO about coating inside of a cup with it.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#7
(02-08-2024, 12:09 AM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: drinking cups?


I have used casting epoxy for vases to waterproof them but nothing says NO about coating inside of a cup with it.

Ask the manufacture of the epoxy if it is approved for food contact.    I know there are epoxies approved for water tanks but unless the particular epoxy was tested and approved you won't see a yes.  Epoxies come in too many flavors to say all epoxy is ok.   Roly
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#8
I did a lot of checking the internet and all of it says once cured it is good to go but total cure is up to a month.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#9
(02-10-2024, 12:35 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: I did a lot of checking the internet and all of it says once cured it is good to go but total cure is up to a month.

The manufacturer for the specific epoxy that you are considering should have a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) (what we used to call a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)).

The SDS is primarily concerned with safety issues for the person handling the raw materials and the as-mixed epoxy, but some mention the as-cured material.

Some of the modern epoxies are food safe when fully-cured (however long that takes).

The epoxies that I helped my father with doing fiberglassing for boats were some that I would never want to trust to drink out of. That was 60ish years ago and there were materials in the catalyst that were definitely not people-friendly.

It is sorta like needing to understand what wood is safe to make tea out of: sassafras - good, hemlock - bad.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

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#10
(02-12-2024, 06:57 PM)iclark Wrote: The manufacturer for the specific epoxy that you are considering should have a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) (what we used to call a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)).

The SDS is primarily concerned with safety issues for the person handling the raw materials and the as-mixed epoxy, but some mention the as-cured material.

Some of the modern epoxies are food safe when fully-cured (however long that takes).

The epoxies that I helped my father with doing fiberglassing for boats were some that I would never want to trust to drink out of. That was 60ish years ago and there were materials in the catalyst that were definitely not people-friendly.

It is sorta like needing to understand what wood is safe to make tea out of: sassafras - good, hemlock - bad.


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It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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