Work to do..
#9
First on the list..
   
Needs replaced...new arm..
   
Cut this 1x to length..then
   
Plane to final size AND shape..test fit..
   
Head was cleaned up..and a new flat was sanded where the thumbscrew goes...was easier than buying a replacement bolt of the correct size, thread and length..

Old pin was FUBAR..
   
Bent and corroded..would just snap off IF I tried to re-use...so..
   
Made a new pin, drilled a tight hole and hammered the new pin into place...
   
Add a coat of Witch's Brew Stain, wipe it down...and call it done...Pin has been sharpened up, as well.

Unable to scroll saw a replacement for..
   
Plan B.
   
I made a simpler version.  Will go back later, add a few pin/screw to the brass, then file it flush...
These are both Stanley No. 77 Mortise/marking Gauges...
   
They do need their points a bit sharper, though...
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#10
On those Stanley heads, there is a brass strip that the thumbscrew tightens against....instead of digging a groove into the arm...
   
Like on this Stanley No. 65.   However..the No. 77 heads are missing theirs...so
   
Tin Snips to cut a strip of Brass to rough size and length...Grinder to final width...clamp the strip into place,,and hammer bend the "tabs" into shape...
   
Need to repeat for the other sliding head...I did remove the strip for a quick grind to shape the tabs better...

Which leaves..
   
These Pine scraps...that have been mostly ripped down from a very NASTY 1 x6..
   
I cut out all the trouble making knotty areas...and since the 1x 6 was cupped..ran the saw right down the center.  

Boards are still 3/4" thick...and a bit too thick to make small boxes with...we have ways..
Tools..
   
Cut-offs?
   
Thins, for dividers and trays?  
Pile #1
   
And pile #2...
   
Each has 4 sides at around 1/2" thick...plus there was a couple I could not run through the tablesaw..
   
That maybe I can resaw into parts to go around a lid's panel? 

Stay tuned..
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#11
Nice save.........
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#12
Holy crap, Bandit! Have you shown how you process trees  tree limbs into fine furniture?
Heirlooms are self-important fiction so build what you like. Someone may find it useful.
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#13
(02-12-2024, 12:44 PM)hbmcc Wrote: Holy crap, Bandit! Have you shown how you process trees  tree limbs into fine furniture?

All I have around here, is a Tulip Tree from the Neighbors...as all the dead limbs seem to fall into my backyard...none worth using...

That Pine  (whitewood?) 1 x 6 came from Lowes, BTW....was part of a stack I bought...the rest became sides and backs for Chest of Drawers drawers..
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#14
I like it.  I have a few that need work but scared to decrease the value since they are non users
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#15
Will start a new thread about that stack of Pine scraps....

This came home with me the other day...
   
Rusty & Krusty?  Price for this "Treasure"?
   
Says $5?    Bought it for $4 out the door...
   

Upon further review...
   
And way less than an hour in the shop...Knob is solid brass...Japanning is a glossy black..
   
That rusty sole cleaned up nicely, and flat..
   
Twins?   One is a 60s Cordovan...the "new" one is a bit older...Stanley hadn't stamped the Model Number into the sides, yet...

So...$4 for an older Stanley No. 60-1/2 Low Angle Block Plane?   You think I may have spent too much?
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#16
As for that rebuilt marking gauge?
   
Almost twins?


Almost...
   
Some slight differences...one is a bit of a Show-off, though..
   
SW No. 65, actually..

Wonder IF I need to add a ruler's markings to the "New & Improved" version?
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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