I’m a believer…
#11
Been reading glowing reports of Shellac on Walnut over the years, but my experience with its poor durability on a a cherry entertainment center 20 years ago kept me rubbing on oil for vertical surfaces, and rubbing out varnish for horizontal surfaces.  No longer….  Broke out the old shellac flakes for this Walnut project, 4 coats of 2lb cut super blond, applied with gold taslon brush, 320 dry in between, final rub with Behlen rubbing compound and finish rub, 2 coats of wax for bourbon insurance.  Walnut grain pops out, pores mostly filled, the color variation glows like a rainbow.  Makes you want to touch it when you get up in the morning.  Gonna have to try this on my Cherry, Maple and Redwood.  I’m a Shellac convert.
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#12
What, no pictures!
Frank
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#13
Yeah, good point Frank, morning sun pretty crappy here, don’t think the grain would pop in a photo. I’ll track the sun and try later.

Blacklab
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#14
I'm confused about the difference between your poor experience with shellac 20 years ago, with some varnish involved somewhere, and what you are doing now. BTW, your bourbon insurance will keep you waxing periodically from now to forever.
Have you ever tried Waterlox on walnut? It's worth a try.
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#15
(02-17-2024, 02:45 PM)Willyou Wrote: I'm confused about the difference between your poor experience with shellac 20 years ago, with some varnish involved somewhere, and what you are doing now. BTW, your bourbon insurance will keep you waxing periodically from now to forever.
Have you ever tried Waterlox on walnut? It's worth a try.

Yeah, Willyou, Waterlox has been on my list for a couple years, but it won’t ship here.

Right you are on the periodic waxing, but this project has only one horizontal surface at floor level, expecting little wear and tear and spillage, its a floor lamp, so I’m was hoping that shellac with two coats of wax was a reasonable compromise.  But bourbon aside, your warning now makes me realize that wax and shellac are likely vulnerable to the chemicals in my carpet shampoo.  My initial reaction to this was to rub a couple of coats of Tung Oil finish on the lamp base…. Until I remembered from bitter experience that Tung Oil finish might also be vulnerable to Bissell chemicals.  So….. I’m about to experiment with a rub on finish that sits neglected in the finish cabinet, rub-on Poly…. Failing that, it’s alkyd varnish.  Any thoughts?
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#16
(02-16-2024, 03:48 PM)blacklab Wrote: Yeah, good point Frank, morning sun pretty crappy here, don’t think the grain would pop in a photo. I’ll track the sun and try later.

Blacklab

My pictures get rejected due to size, Frank…..  Do you know how to make them an acceptable size?
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#17
If you have wax on it, applying any additional finish got a whole lot harder.  You would need to wipe it, several times, with mineral spirits to remove the wax.  Several times, each time with a clean cloth.  After the wax is off, you can apply any OB finish of your choice.  Waterlox, Arm-R-Seal are both great choices.  

FWIW, no matter how many coats of wax you apply, bourbon, ammonia, and several other liquids will cause serious damage to shellac if left in contact with it for very long.  Varnishes are much better for durability.  

John
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#18
The poly should work. Don't know about the alkyd varnish.
They won't ship Waterlox to you, but you can get alkyd varnish ???
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#19
(02-17-2024, 07:29 PM)Willyou Wrote: The poly should work. Don't know about the alkyd varnish.
They won't ship Waterlox to you, but you can get alkyd varnish ???

Yeah, Willyou, Major national franchises carry the traditional alkyd marine varnishes…. Rust oleum, Ace, McCloskey, but they get their inventory by barge… Any flammable needing to board an aircraft gets rejected.  Not enough demand for the more refined product to interest the larger franchises.  Looks like the demand for the traditional alkyd varnish is beginning to dwindle also.  Drove 40 miles for a can of Ace a couple weeks ago.
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#20
(02-17-2024, 06:53 PM)blacklab Wrote: My pictures get rejected due to size, Frank…..  Do you know how to make them an acceptable size?

Free download

https://www.fookes.com/easy-thumbnails
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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