Stanley 750 chisel
#7
  
I just finished a video on rehabbing a Stanley socket chisel. I know this is probably remedial-level stuff for most of the folks here, but thought I'd share anyways:

https://youtu.be/OHBhar6xsu8
Vince Ancona
WoodNet Moderator
Editor, Woodsmith Magazine
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#8
  Re: Stanley 750 chisel by Vince (I just finished a vi...)
(06-07-2019, 09:28 AM)Vince Wrote: I just finished a video on rehabbing a Stanley socket chisel. I know this is probably remedial-level stuff for most of the folks here, but thought I'd share anyways:

https://youtu.be/OHBhar6xsu8

Fun video. I used to love rehabbing old tools.  Don't do it as much anymore. This brought back many fond memories. Can I offer a few of my tips?

1) I used to turn those sorts of handles with the socket end pointing toward the tail stock. I would just leave the other (butt) end long or whatever, so I could fix the taper using the lathe instead of sanding it.  Also, I used inside calipers inside the socket in 2 places to get the handle's taper close. Also, I wanted the handle part above the shoulder to match or blend in with the chisels socket angle. So that was one smooth surface. I always left a gap like you did.

2) I'm not sure the leather helps. But rounding the butt end is a good idea if you don't.

3) After flattening the back, I always ground the bevels to create:
a) a sharp corner where the sides meet the back
b) a taper such that the edge is the widest part of the chisel. Good chisels were always made like this. Not sure about 750s.

After that, I used to stone off that corner to within about 1/2" of the edge so I didn't get cut by that corner.

4) Just a thought - I've been playing around with metal finishes. I too have used evoporust.  But instead of polishing the oxide layer off (or whatever that is), I've soaked the tool in oil after the evaporust.  Likewise, you could have done that from the get go and skipped the evaporust since so much grinding was necessary anyway. That way the socket remains dark. I think evaporust protects against rust. By removing that layer, (of whatever) you removed a rust preventative? This is just a personal preference thing, but maybe someone would like to try that.

5) After turning the handle, but prior to final fitting, I used to soak my handles in linseed oil for a couple days. I felt like this provided additional shock absorption. Still today when I use a mallet on some chisels, liquid linseed oil rises to the surface. It doesn't really dry inside the wood (because it air dries). It also changes, in my opinion improves, the balance of the tool.

6) I sometimes put leather washers between the socket and the handle on some chisels. Always wanted to try using a rubber O ring, but was afraid men with torches and steam bent wooden pitch forks would come for me.

I wonder if Paul Sellers has done one of these videos. I feel like he often has a bunch of thoughts similar to what I wrote above, little things he does.

anyway, thanks for the video, Vince.
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#9
  Re: Stanley 750 chisel by Vince (I just finished a vi...)
(06-07-2019, 09:28 AM)Vince Wrote: I just finished a video on rehabbing a Stanley socket chisel. I know this is probably remedial-level stuff for most of the folks here, but thought I'd share anyways:

https://youtu.be/OHBhar6xsu8
.................
Good save, Vince...You gave the old guy a new life !!!!!! Winkgrin Big Grin

Nice video also, BTW!! Cool
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#10
  Re: Stanley 750 chisel by Vince (I just finished a vi...)
Adam -- Thanks for the reply and I appreciate the tips and hearing from your experience. It's funny because a few of things you mentioned had actually crossed my mind as I was making the video.

1) I used to turn the handles with the socket taper facing the tailstock because, like you say, it makes fitting the taper to the chisel easier. Then I saw someone who added the leather washers the way I show in the video and it made sense, so I reversed the direction. If I skipped the leather washers, I could go back to the old way. I've never tried using inside calipers, but that's a good idea. I've also thought about using some modeling clay and stuffing it down inside the chisel socket to get an impression of the taper, but haven't actually tried that either. I've never done a study on it, but I've wondered if there was any standardization to the taper angle of these socket chisels. You would think that there would at least be a consistent taper angle in all the chisels from one manufacturer, if not across manufacturers, but I've never bothered to look into it. Like you, I do try to make the taper angle of the socket portion match the angle of the handle just above the socket so that the two are in alignment when the handle is installed.

2) Agree that the leather is not really necessary. I think it's best just to view handles as consumable items and plan on replacing them occasionally when they finally become worn out.

3) I was thinking that grinding the side bevels would make a good video all on it's own, but I don't have a lot of experience in that area. I'll have to experiment with that a bit. The Stanleys aren't very good in that regard. They have pretty thick lands on the sides of the chisel. I'm not sure why the Stanley 750s are as popular as they are, since they really are just a mass-produced, consumer-grade tool (although, still a decent tool).

4) I've never liked the dull finish left behind by the Evaporust or by electrolysis. Soaking in oil is something I've never thought of, but now I'll have to try it. Thanks for the tip!

5) Soaking the handles in linseed oil sounds like a good idea as well and I'll have to try that one. I've tried a few different finishes on the handles. Lacquer is tough, but it tends to leave the handles too slippery for my taste. The Peacock Oil product I used in the video was okay, but it didn't seem much different than the turpentine/linseed oil/beeswax finish I mix up myself. I tend to prefer the a simple oil finish for tool handles because they can be renewed easily and they seem to take a on a character of their own through use.

6) I've never tried a leather washer between the chisel and the handle, although I have a couple of oval bolster mortise chisels that have that feature.

I enjoy Paul Sellers videos as well. I know he's done some chisel sharpening videos and also some videos on the Aldi chisels, but I'll have to go back and see what else he may have done.

Again, thanks for taking the time to share your suggestions. I appreciate the feedback.
Vince Ancona
WoodNet Moderator
Editor, Woodsmith Magazine
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#11
  Re: Stanley 750 chisel by Vince (I just finished a vi...)
(06-07-2019, 01:12 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: .................
Good save, Vince...You gave the old guy a new life !!!!!! Winkgrin  Big Grin

Nice video also, BTW!!  Cool

Thanks Jack!
Vince Ancona
WoodNet Moderator
Editor, Woodsmith Magazine
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#12
  Re: RE: Stanley 750 chisel by Timberwolf ([quote='Vince' pid='...)
(06-07-2019, 01:12 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: .................
Good save, Vince...You gave the old guy a new life !!!!!! Winkgrin  Big Grin

Nice video also, BTW!!  Cool


+1


I need to get back into rehabbing. It's fun.
Steve





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