Router table with no insert plate question
#11
  Re: (...)
I am going to build a router table. It will be sort of like the Norm Abrams router table. My last one was built into my table saw. But I have upgraded to a Sawstop and decided I would rather have a stand alone router table.

My question is, do I have to use an insert plate? 90% of my routing is done on the router table. I will be using a Freud FT1700 router. I can adjust the height and change bits above the table.

If I make the top strong is there any reason I need an insert plate? Only thing I can think of would be the inserts around the bits. My last router plate had a 2" hole and that worked for everything I ever needed.
If it wasn't for last minute, nothing would get done.

Visit my site for project pics and videos: dlgwoodwork.com
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#12
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
If you use various diameter cutters then insert plates would be needed.
You indicate that your routing is mostly done with 2" and less cutters.
In that case a 2" hole will suffice.My router table has a 3" cut out.I also have a 3/8 " plywood auxillary table with a 1-1/2" cut out that installs over the main table.

mike
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#13
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
Sizing for a rectangular plate to put the round inserts for different bit sizes into would be much easier to do, than trying to make a perfectly round insert hole. Plus the throat plates are threaded so you can screw the round inserts into them, magnetic, or screwed down to the plate. How would you affix them otherwise? For something that is such easy work, and the plates aren't incredibly expensive. I guess I just don't see a reason not to just mount a plate.

This kid makes it look easy

It really is




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4utHdZO3iA


Edit to add, you will want different size throat plates, maybe not today, but you will.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
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#14
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
You do not need a router plate: bolting the router directly to the top works fine. However, keep in mind that most materials you use for a router table top are thicker than a router plate in order to have the needed rigidity. Make sure your router will not lose needed depth of cut.
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#15
  Re: Re: Router table with no insert plate question by Alan S (You do not need a ro...)
I didn't think of the depth of cut part. Looks like I'm better off going with a plate.

Now it's off to find a good router plate.
If it wasn't for last minute, nothing would get done.

Visit my site for project pics and videos: dlgwoodwork.com
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#16
  Re: Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I didn't think of th...)
Thickness isn't a problem. Mount the router to a 1/2 mdf . Then cut a hole the shape of the router base in a 3/4 mdf. End result 1 1/4 thick top with only 1/2 inch at the bit.
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#17
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
Imho, the most important thing is not to tighten the height adjustment lock too much.
I've had to get replacements for broken parts on my 1700 router 5 times, in 3 years, with light use.
Love/hate relationship with that router.
I long for the days when Coke was a soft drink, and Black and Decker was a quality tool.
Happiness is a snipe free planer
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#18
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
You often see routers mounted without the removable plate in production shops. In one shop there were a number of router set up with commonly used bits such as a 1/8" roundover. Hal Taylor shows a router table with several routers with bits he uses a lot. These guys have routers dedicated to those bits and they don't have to worry about the size of the hole because they are not changing bits. It saves them a lot of money they would spend for plates and a lot of time because they don't waste time changing bits. Ken
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#19
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
I read an article in a magazine (I cannot remember which now) where the writer said he preferred no insert. He simply reduced the thickness of the plywood with a router to accommodate the router itself. He claimed that this guaranteed that the router was flat and the base was parallel to the work surface.

It seemed like less work to install an insert. But if I were making a portable "table" (a sheet of plywood to rest on saw horses) I think I would do just that.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#20
  Re: Router table with no insert plate question by dlgWoodWork (I am going to build ...)
DLG: please check your private messages, re Saw Stop. Thanks.
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