Respect Drill Presses (3)
#21
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
I clamp round items to V grooves or V blocks and clamp the block.

I use a milldrill as a drill press and the T slot table works really well with a milling vise or a hold down clamp set. I made a wooden surface I can clamp up in the vice too.




On my big mill I use an indexable threaded table for positioning and for bolting down hold downs and vices and for part placement registration and for jig hold downs.

These ideas all work well for ww as well. Make a sub table.


Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

Reply
#22
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
Thank you all for posting.
Reply
#23
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
(11-22-2016, 08:34 AM)Admiral Wrote: +3 on wooden handscrew clamps, I have two that live at the drill press. Clamp workpiece in one, use other to clamp the first clamp to the table.


Right next to the BS too for smallish pieces, I'd much rather sand or cut an inanimate object as my hand any day Wink
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
Reply
#24
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
Back about 15 years ago when Bell Labs still had a machine shop (not much physical research being done nowadays) there was a sign on the outside of the door which said "Machines don't have a brain - use your own."  Very true.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
Reply
#25
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
(11-25-2016, 10:02 AM)Admiral Wrote: Back about 15 years ago when Bell Labs still had a machine shop (not much physical research being done nowadays) there was a sign on the outside of the door which said "Machines don't have a brain - use your own."  Very true.



 Wasn't it "Shopsmith" that would always say in their commercials; "And since the skills are built right into the machine..." . Rolleyes
Reply
#26
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
I don't remember ever hearing that from ShopSmith, After they were in Cali, they have been in Dayton Ohio. I worked there several years, and between being in their home market, and working there I thought I had seen all of their ads. When I was there we were religious about respecting the machine, and trying to pass along all we could about safe operation. I really would like to see that ad, I would be shocked to see ShopSmith on it.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
Reply
#27
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
I did my own footwork, and perhaps you read the Google paraphrase from this following ad, where they do say the "The precision is built right in" The words skill, also appear in the ad. The Google made it look like it said the skill was built right in.

This ad

Well I stand corrected, right at the end the yoyo who made the ad put all the lines together and made a stupid statement. I would have to assume the heads of the company, and the actual product managers missed this. I don't remember this specific ad, but it is what it is. Believe me that wasn't the thought process of the people I worked with, skill would be acquired, not purchased, it comes along with experience, and education.
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
Reply
#28
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
I got 9 stitches when I did something stupid!  While using a fly cutter, I was trying to clear a melamine  plug with a scrap board. The board jumped off center and before I knew it, my thumb banged against the spinning cutter. Could have been worse.


Al
I turn, therefore I am!
Reply
#29
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
When I use a fly-cutter I like to mount a transparent shield on the drill press table.  In part if keeps chips from flying in my face as I make the cut.  It makes it more difficult to put my hands or nose in the way of the cutter.

I framed a flat polycarbonate sheet such that it attaches to T-track near the front of the table.  The shield can slide laterally out of the way for adjusting the setup, then slide back for the cut.  The top edge of the screen is marked in red.  Besides being a barrier, the shield reminds me that this is not the ordinary setup of the press that I am used to with the usual compact cylindrical bit in the chuck.  

Even at the lowest speed, the cutter moves alarmingly fast and cuts an arc much wider than any ordinary drill bit.  My press goes down to 150 RPM; even at this slowest speed, that’s still 2-1/2 RPS, and the movement of the cutter is just a blur.  It’s easy to forget it’s there, especially if I’m trying to focus on the cut.  For that reason I like to put a physical barrier between the cutter and me.

I had one “surprise” with this setup and was glad my hands and face were out of harm’s way.  I had a circle-cutter where the cutting tool was machined to a reduced rectangular cross-section from 1/4” HSS cylindrical stock.  I wanted to cut a hole in 3/4” plywood, but the undersized machined portion of the cutter was only 5/8” long.  

The problem is obvious after the fact, but I did not see it coming.  When I went over 5/8” depth, the cutter bound in the cut and, Bang! - seemed like all hell broke loose.  Fortunately, just the taper came loose, and the chuck dropped down on the table with no damage.  My racing heart and surging blood pressure might be another matter.   

I retired that tool and got another circle-cutter with a cutting tool of uniform square cross-section in a square hole.
Reply
#30
  Re: Respect Drill Presses (3) by gMike (In line with the tab...)
Fly cutters.

I watched a friend find out they get to almost full speed before the cutter flies off when you totally forget to tighten it up. He and I were both lucky, a hole in the drywall behind the drill.

It was of this design



Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.