Beer Tap Handles
#7
  
I just received a moderate sized order for Beer Tap Handles from a local microbrew/distributor. I'd delivered them a prototype finished with Watco Laquer but wonder how the finish will hold up long term to the "alcohol rich" environment around a beer tap. Would there be something better to finish them with?

Prototype was 5/4 quarter sawn white oak.
UniqueWood220 Quality 1911 and USMC Grips can now be found at gunbroker.com
Reply
#8
  Re: Beer Tap Handles by Gary™ (I just received a mo...)
(09-12-2019, 05:51 AM)Gary™ Wrote: I just received a moderate sized order for Beer Tap Handles from a local microbrew/distributor.  I'd delivered them a prototype finished with Watco Laquer but wonder how the finish will hold up long term to the "alcohol rich" environment around a beer tap.  Would there be something better to finish them with?

Prototype was 5/4 quarter sawn white oak.

Its going to take something that will withstand both the alcohol, the water/cleaning solution and LOTS of hands. I would think an epoxy finish would be your best bet.
Reply
#9
  Re: Beer Tap Handles by Gary™ (I just received a mo...)
NC Lacquer just isn't all that durable, it's a thin finish with fewer solids than some others. For this application maybe consider some form of catalyzed finish.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
Reply
#10
  Re: Beer Tap Handles by Gary™ (I just received a mo...)
If it were me I'd just make them all out of African blackwood and skip the finish. It's impervious to water damage so no finish needed.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
Reply
#11
  Re: Beer Tap Handles by Gary™ (I just received a mo...)
Cheap and pretty good would be varnish like Waterlox, Arm-R-Seal, etc.  Expensive but really good would be a 2 part polyurethane.  Epoxy is good but yellows with exposure to UV unless it has stabilizers in it.


John
Reply
#12
  Re: RE: Beer Tap Handles by jteneyck (Cheap and pretty goo...)
(09-12-2019, 11:55 AM)jteneyck Wrote: Cheap and pretty good would be varnish like Waterlox, Arm-R-Seal, etc.  Expensive but really good would be a 2 part polyurethane.  Epoxy is good but yellows with exposure to UV unless it has stabilizers in it.


John

Hadn't considered Arm-R-Seal for this project but I've used that before with good results. I've done epoxy finish on a cedar strip canoe and it's too much $$$/time for this project. I've only allocate 12 minutes each to sand and finish each in the bid.
UniqueWood220 Quality 1911 and USMC Grips can now be found at gunbroker.com
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.