Tablesaw Blade Choice
#11
  
Time to buy a new tablesaw blade for my 3 HP cabinet saw. Looking for general purpose for both ripping and crosscutting. I know that Forest Woodworker is probably top-of-the-heap but I'm not sure I want to spend that much. Just read a couple of reviews on the Freud Diablo which were positive. It's a combo blade, thin kerf. Haven't used a thin kerf blade in quite a while.

Recommendations from personal experience would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Doug
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#12
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
Doug, I guess it will come down to what you want to spend. I have dedicated rip and crosscut blades by Leitz, and prefer to use a combination blade from Leuco. The performance of all is top notch, but the prices are as well.

.. on a train to Prague

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#13
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
Freud is my go-to brand for tablesaw blades.  I usually keep a 50-tooth thin-kerf combo blade installed most of the time, only changing out for dado operations (a Freud SD508) or a significant instance of ripping (Freud's 30-tooth Glue line rip blade).  I'm not hesitant at all to use that combo blade for ripping operations and it does a nice crosscut. The kerf on my big sled is sized for that thin kerf blade.

I (very briefly) considered getting a Forrest Woodworker II, but I don't think I'll ever see the benefit from spending over twice as much for a blade.

I find that the Freud blades sharpen and hold edges pretty well.  And if I lose one to an "oops" on my Sawstop, as has happened once over the past eight years, then I'm not out a great deal of money for a replacement.

As for the Diablo versus their standard line, I can't really talk to that.  I don't know the real difference there.
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#14
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
Stehle—if you can locate a reseller.
https://www.stehle-int.com/static/stehle...locale=ENG
Gary

Please don’t quote the trolls.
Liberty, Freedom and Individual Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.

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#15
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
Doug,
I have a Freud LU84R011 50t full kerf combo and a WWll sharpened by Forrest that I use on my SS. I think the Freud gives a cleaner cut than the WWll for a little over half the $. It is my go to for clean cuts. Full kerf blades make math easier (IMHO) when figuring the cut width in multiple cuts.

g
I've only had one...in dog beers.
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#16
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
I wouldn't suggest a thin kerf for your saw, but if you insist make sure the splitter or riving knife will work with a TK.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#17
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
The riving knife on my SS is not really sized for a thin kerf blade.  It works, but at its thickest point, the RK is slightly thicker than the thin kerf blade.
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#18
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
Hard to beat the Freud Fusion: its on my saw 99% of the time.


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#19
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
I agree with Philip 1231, It is hard to beat the Freud Fusion as a general purpose table saw blade. Any time I have a series of rips and cross cuts, it is my go to blade. Otherwise, I like Freud blades, rip, cross cut and plywood and melamine.  
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#20
  Re: Tablesaw Blade Choice by Tapper (Time to buy a new ta...)
I have a few different blades for my saw; I have a Forrest WWII standard kerf blade, a 50T freud crosscut and 24T Freud glue line rip. They all are excellent blades. The WWII is on the saw most of the time.

I also wouldn't recommend a thin kerf. For me they are not stiff enough for thick or dense woods like African blackwood.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
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