Large format tile setting
#11
  
I am remodeling the guest bathroom. 

I am very near the point where I have to order the tile for the floor and for the bathtub surround.

I have limited experience laying tile, just one floor in one half-bath.  I used 12" x 12" tiles and the job turned out very nice.

I like the look of large format tile.  I would like to use 24" x 24" tile for the bathtub surround, and either 12" x 24" in a brick pattern or a straight lay, or 24" x 24" in a straight lay.

I have two questions:

1.  Is the large format tile a "trend" that will look dated 10 years from now?

2.  Is it appreciably more difficult to lay large format tile than 12" x 12" tile?  





No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#12
  Re: Large format tile setting by Cooler (I am remodeling the ...)
I'm an amateur but have done a fair amount of tiling, especially in the last year or two. Larger format tiles require a flat substrate. Floor, walls need to be FLAT and if they aren't, fix them. Tiles need to be flat too, so check them especially if you are going with narrower grout lines. I was able to get rectified tiles (where they grind the tiles after firing to ensure accurate dimensions). Generally I find it more challenging to work with the larger formats. Mine were 12 x 24 on the walls and 12 x 12 on the floor, not as large as the 24x24 you are considering. Check out the tile leveling systems, ceramic tiles can flex a bit and for me made an improvement in the finished product.

As to the trends....who really knows.
Reply
#13
  Re: RE: Large format tile setting by joe1086 (I'm an amateur but h...)
(05-12-2020, 12:59 PM)joe1086 Wrote: I'm an amateur but have done a fair amount of tiling, especially in the last year or two. Larger format tiles require a flat substrate. Floor, walls need to be FLAT and if they aren't, fix them. Tiles need to be flat too, so check them especially if you are going with narrower grout lines. I was able to get rectified tiles (where they grind the tiles after firing to ensure accurate dimensions). Generally I find it more challenging to work with the larger formats. Mine were 12 x 24 on the walls and 12 x 12 on the floor, not as large as the 24x24 you are considering. Check out the tile leveling systems, ceramic tiles can flex a bit and for me made an improvement in the finished product.

As to the trends....who really knows.

The tiles I am looking at have "rectified edges", but they don't say anything about the bottoms being rectified. 

The 24" x 24" weigh about 20 pounds each (3 tiles to a box @ 55 pounds).  That is a consideration.  I believe the floor to be flat, at least as flat as the other bathroom I tiled.

I am applying the cement board now for the surround.  I have not yet applied adjacent boards having just applied one 30" wide board on one wall and a second 30" wide board on the next wall.

I did learn that I had to lift the cement board about 3/8" above the tub or the lip on the tub would prevent the board from laying flat.  The previous surface was wire mesh and concrete (the house was built in 1953 and has all steel mesh for the plaster walls and concrete floor which made demolition a bit challenging.

I will apply the rest of the cement boards (except for the shower mixer wall) this weekend.  I am not calling in a plumber at this time (I  need a new water supply line, waste flange and waste pipe for the toilet, and replace a leaky shutoff valve which I could not remove).  I will get as far as I can and stop until it seems safe to bring in an outside contractor to the house.  This Covid 19 this is a headache.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#14
  Re: Large format tile setting by Cooler (I am remodeling the ...)
I would suggest you research the Laticrete website a little. Large format tiles are currently in trend, but they are much more difficult to lay; especially on walls. They require certain mastics to hold them in place due to their weight and size.

As others have noted, they require level (smooth) sub-surfaces or they will not fit flush. You cannot just add more mortar underneath, especially to walls or it creates another set of problems. I've seen a lot of issues and made more than a few contractors remove everything back down to studs and start over. 

They tiles look great, just take time and precision.
Reply
#15
  Re: RE: Large format tile setting by jamesglenn (I would suggest you ...)
(05-12-2020, 03:15 PM)jamesglenn Wrote: I would suggest you research the Laticrete website a little. Large format tiles are currently in trend, but they are much more difficult to lay; especially on walls. They require certain mastics to hold them in place due to their weight and size.

As others have noted, they require level (smooth) sub-surfaces or they will not fit flush. You cannot just add more mortar underneath, especially to walls or it creates another set of problems. I've seen a lot of issues and made more than a few contractors remove everything back down to studs and start over. 

They tiles look great, just take time and precision.
I have time; the precision might be an issue.  I used tile spacers for the precision part on the first job.   And a level to make sure there was no "lippage". 

I have since bought spacers that solve the lippage issue. 

I may use smaller tiles for the walls and larger ones on the floor.  My tile cutter is limited to 24" and I hate using the wet saw.  Too messy, too slow.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#16
  Re: Large format tile setting by Cooler (I am remodeling the ...)
(05-12-2020, 04:54 PM)Cooler Wrote: I have time; the precision might be an issue.  I used tile spacers for the precision part on the first job.   And a level to make sure there was no "lippage". 

I have since bought spacers that solve the lippage issue. 

I may use smaller tiles for the walls and larger ones on the floor.  My tile cutter is limited to 24" and I hate using the wet saw.  Too messy, too slow.


I reread my post, and I don't mean to discourage or under estimate your abilities. This is fresh on my mind, as I just went thru a seminar about setting large format tiles and the issues associated.

As noted, I highly recommend Laticrete products which are numerous and something for each specific install and condition. I specify them on every project and have had success, so far.
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Large format tile setting by jamesglenn ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(05-13-2020, 01:08 PM)jamesglenn Wrote: I reread my post, and I don't mean to discourage or under estimate your abilities. This is fresh on my mind, as I just went thru a seminar about setting large format tiles and the issues associated.

As noted, I highly recommend Laticrete products which are numerous and something for each specific install and condition. I specify them on every project and have had success, so far.
This is for an almost-never-used bathroom.  I am remodeling it for two reasons:

1.  To keep me busy during the Covid 19 lockdown.

2.  To improve resale value in about 10 years.

I have to keep reminding myself of the priorities here.  I tend to over-build and over-specify everything I make.  So easier and cheaper is going to be better as long as it keeps me busy and it improves the appearance of the room.

The bathroom I tore out was original to the house (built in 1953) and featured powder blue fixtures and a pocket door that separated the toilet and sink in one area and the shower and sink and vanity in the other.  I closed off both rooms and I am adding a toilet.  So in place of one bath I will end up with a half bath and a full bath.  I think this improves the house's value (if it looks good).  The half bath does look good.

Thanks for the information.

Cooler
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#18
  Re: Large format tile setting by Cooler (I am remodeling the ...)
Nothing to add here other than that I grew up in Bethany, CT, where Laticrete is HQed.  Lived about 3/4 a mile from their HQ.  I remember in the 70s when they broke ground for their building(s).

That is all, carry on.....  Smile
Dumber than I appear
Reply
#19
  Re: Large format tile setting by Cooler (I am remodeling the ...)
  • I can offer a few suggestions.
  • Make sure the wall is as flat. If you need to, staple cardboard shims (not corrugated) made for that purpose, to the studs before the concrete board goes up.
  • Invest in a leveling system. there's a few different types out there but consider those that use pliers to cinch the wedges in, and have good reviews of breaking off clean. They also ensure the tile doesn't fall off the wall when you turn you back!
  •  Back-butter your tiles and pull a few back off to check for coverage at the beginning.
  • That gap at the tub should be packed with G.E. silicone then cut flush when it's fully cured. Don't wipe it with your finger; the thin film left behind will curse you throughout the project.
  • If your putting in an accent stripe, just use full length strips of 3/8" plywood as a spacer and finish the field. the accent is never the same thickness as the tiles. I made a quick jig to keep a bed coat the right depth from the tile face so I could use a smaller notched trowel to set the accents.
  • Work neat! Using a grout saw to cut out thin-set that could have been wiped out yesterday sucks.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply
#20
  Re: RE: Large format tile setting by MstrCarpenter ([list] [*]I can off...)
(05-19-2020, 12:55 AM)MstrCarpenter Wrote:
  • I can offer a few suggestions.
  • Make sure the wall is as flat. If you need to, staple cardboard shims (not corrugated) made for that purpose, to the studs before the concrete board goes up.
  • Invest in a leveling system. there's a few different types out there but consider those that use pliers to cinch the wedges in, and have good reviews of breaking off clean. They also ensure the tile doesn't fall off the wall when you turn you back!
  •  Back-butter your tiles and pull a few back off to check for coverage at the beginning.
  • That gap at the tub should be packed with G.E. silicone then cut flush when it's fully cured. Don't wipe it with your finger; the thin film left behind will curse you throughout the project.
  • If your putting in an accent stripe, just use full length strips of 3/8" plywood as a spacer and finish the field. the accent is never the same thickness as the tiles. I made a quick jig to keep a bed coat the right depth from the tile face so I could use a smaller notched trowel to set the accents.
  • Work neat! Using a grout saw to cut out thin-set that could have been wiped out yesterday sucks.

Thanks,

I have rethought my design and I will be using white subway tile for the tub surround, but larger format tile for the floor. 

The large format tile on the walls seemed intimidating.  They are heavy and I am less certain that my wall will be perfectly flat.  The floor is perfectly flat and I have filled any voids with self-leveling concrete.  

When I set the 12 x 12 tiles I made a test to see if I got full coverage with the notched trowel I was using.  I will do the same here.

I went to the local grocery store and they recently remodeled the store with wood-look planking in (probably) porcelain as it is a high traffic area.  But they left zero space for grout and I am fairly certain that none was used.  Is this even practical?  Why would they do that?  The tiles I had bought listed "minimum 1/8" grout required". 

These planks were about 8" x 48".

Cooler
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.