SawStop: Eating Crow
#31
(09-15-2022, 10:33 AM)CStan Wrote: Hopefully.  

I've often wondered what happens to those cartridges and sensors after sitting in a dusty environment, no HVAC, cycling hot, cold, dry, humid, for years.  I guess at some point we'll find out.

Just won't give it up, will you? The cartridges are well designed and protected. I suppose some fool could abuse one and cause it to fail (maybe pour water in it?). In any event, even if one does fail, the ones that don't will eventually prevent many catastrophic tablesaw injuries. It's proven technology and has saved members here already.

Just for the record I've set off one cartridge. Accidentally ran my miter gauge into the blade. Minor scratch on the aluminum head. Did purchase a new blade - small price to pay for this wonderful technology IMO.

Doug
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#32
My saw is ten years old.  First couple of years it was set up in totally unconditioned space.  The current shop is heated in the winter time.  Shop temps in summer regularly go well over 90 degrees.

I'm not very good about keeping the saw cleaned out.  Last year I got into that cabinet and cleaned out nine years of accumulated dust on the mechanicals, degreased and re-lubed the elevation and tilt gearing/mechanisms and such.  It was an all-afternoon job.

I have had two brake triggers.  

  - The first was when the saw was two years old.  I was working late one evening, was very tired, and still going at it.  I laid the blade over for a 45 bevel and didn't pay attention to blade geometry with respect to the aluminum miter fence.  Oops...that one was on me...

  - The second was an anomaly about six years ago.  I was working with the dado stack.  I took break for lunch and left the master switch in the "ON" position.  When I came back, I noticed the red blinking status light on the switch box.  I found the spring on the brake had released, and the brake block was resting against the dado stack.  The dado stack was only contacting the brake block, not buried in it.  I was able to remove the brake cartridge and the dado stack, which was not damaged at all.  I called SawStop and talked with them about the sequence of events.  They sent me a new dado brake cartridge and asked me to return the "sprung" cartridge for examination, which I did.  I never did hear what the results were from their inspection of the sprung cartridge.

As far as I'm concerned, the equipment is well-designed and protected for shop environments.
Ray
(formerly "WxMan")
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#33
Congrats. It's never too late to wan a ss. Period.

Simon
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#34
(09-17-2022, 09:17 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: Congrats. It's never too late to wan a ss. Period.

Simon

Never too late to do what now?  
Confused
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#35
Sorry...never too late to get a sawstop.

The ss technology is so reliable that no one has sued the company for failing in any aspects.

I hope other manufacturers will release their ss once the relevant patents expire as some people decide not to have a ss because of their grudges with the inventor, not because they're invincible.

Simon
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#36
(09-21-2022, 07:41 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: Sorry...never too late to get a sawstop.

The ss technology is so reliable that no one has sued the company for failing in any aspects.

I hope other manufacturers will release their ss once the relevant patents expire as some people decide not to have a ss because of their grudges with the inventor, not because they're invincible.

Simon

 That would amount to capitulation - my guess is that most will remain defiant. 

Doug
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#37
Some will remain defiant, most? I don't think so. The Bosch Reaxx received favorable responses...until the ss inventor won his case.

Money is a big reason why many are hesitant in getting a ss. We can expect the ss clones to be price competitive once the patents are gone.

Simon
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#38
I know where there's a NIB sawstop, just sitting there.  guy who bought it, passed before he got it setup, his wife hasn't bothered to go through his tools yet.

Not sure which model it is.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

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#39
(Yesterday, 12:08 PM)meackerman Wrote: I know where there's a NIB sawstop, just sitting there.  guy who bought it, passed before he got it setup, his wife hasn't bothered to go through his tools yet.

Not sure which model it is.

It always is a sad thing when a woodworker never gets to touch and play a new toy, and then passes.

I promise myself that I'd never let my family worry about my tools and machines as I'd get rid of most of the machinery and pricey tools well before I'm gone. Some people still have a fully equipped shop in their 80s (whether they're active in their shops is a different story). If I live to 80 or over, I'll keep only simple basic tools such as cordless drills, a few hammers and chisels, the apron plane, etc. Starting 75, I'll begin my phased disposals, with the ss kept until all others  have gone.

Some woodworkers will get to use and enjoy my tool collection early, not after I die!

Simon
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#40
a lot/most of us don't know when our time is up.  one day it just is.

could happen at any time in someone's life.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

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