Used Tool pricing is interesting…
#29
Whether I am buying or selling I always take a look at the price of a new piece of equipment costs. I was in the Woodsmith last Monday and they had a new Jet 6 inch jointer with straight knives for sell for somewhere around $1200 plus tax which is 7% in Iowa. Actually it is 5% but local option tax inters in.

So my question is why is a used jointer in comparable condition not a good buy, if the person is asking $600?  Wanting a jointer , and I say wanting, isn't going to do you any work if you don't have one, and  because you expect the person to just give it away. And the prices of jointers are going to continue going up. Personally I think that $600 is a really good buy, remember comparable condition.

I guess a person needs to decide what a fair price for a piece of equipment is and how much you want it and how much use you are going to get out of it, verses new price. Used prices are going to go up because new prices are going up all the time and as that happens not as many are going to be sold because less and less people are beginning to take up the hobby.

Tom
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#30
(03-30-2024, 09:56 AM)tablesawtom Wrote: Whether I am buying or selling I always take a look at the price of a new piece of equipment costs. I was in the Woodsmith last Monday and they had a new Jet 6 inch jointer with straight knives for sell for somewhere around $1200 plus tax which is 7% in Iowa. Actually it is 5% but local option tax inters in.

So my question is why is a used jointer in comparable condition not a good buy, if the person is asking $600?  Wanting a jointer , and I say wanting, isn't going to do you any work if you don't have one, and  because you expect the person to just give it away. And the prices of jointers are going to continue going up. Personally I think that $600 is a really good buy, remember comparable condition.

I guess a person needs to decide what a fair price for a piece of equipment is and how much you want it and how much use you are going to get out of it, verses new price. Used prices are going to go up because new prices are going up all the time and as that happens not as many are going to be sold because less and less people are beginning to take up the hobby.

Tom

Tom, I am with you on tools that are still being produced, Generally I feel like somewhere between 50-75% of new is a fair deal depending on what the market is for said tool.

Of course Festool tends to get closer to 75% or above but a used Dewalt I’m probably not going above 50%.

Where I get more conflicted, is something like a Woodtek planer, saw one locally that’s probably over 10 years old, and as you probably know, Woodworkers supply who sold them just went under.  The seller wants $850 for a 15 inch planer, that may be a decent deal, it’s certainly not a screaming deal in my book.  Depending on the condition of the planer, it could also be a horrible deal, especially when you consider parts may not be readily available.  


I am like many woodworkers more interested in a helical head planer and will probably hold out for one, although if I found a good enough deal on a straight knife to make it worth retrofitting it with a helical head, I would do that as well.
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#31
(03-30-2024, 09:56 AM)tablesawtom Wrote: Whether I am buying or selling I always take a look at the price of a new piece of equipment costs. I was in the Woodsmith last Monday and they had a new Jet 6 inch jointer with straight knives for sell for somewhere around $1200 plus tax which is 7% in Iowa. Actually it is 5% but local option tax inters in.

So my question is why is a used jointer in comparable condition not a good buy, if the person is asking $600?  Wanting a jointer , and I say wanting, isn't going to do you any work if you don't have one, and  because you expect the person to just give it away. And the prices of jointers are going to continue going up. Personally I think that $600 is a really good buy, remember comparable condition.

I guess a person needs to decide what a fair price for a piece of equipment is and how much you want it and how much use you are going to get out of it, verses new price. Used prices are going to go up because new prices are going up all the time and as that happens not as many are going to be sold because less and less people are beginning to take up the hobby.

Tom


I couldn't have said it any better, Tom.  You can't compare the asking price with the original price because you can't buy a new one for that price anymore.  The comparison is against the same machine new today, or a similar machine if that one is no longer made.  

Used machines w/o the latest and said to be greatest technology often go for well less than half of new ones.  Jointers and planers with straight knives, for example.  RAS's are an amazing bargain, almost give away, even old Dewalts and Delta's.  With a little elbow grease, you can outfit a shop with some terrific used machines.   

John
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#32
Yes, RAS are a great bargain today. The old Delta contractors are also a great bargain too. They have a bad rep for going out of alignment but if the trunnion bolts are replaced with grade 5 or 8 bolts it gets rid of bolt stretch and the stays in alignment.

Both of my planners use knives.  I have a Delta 15 inch and a Rockwell 33 which is a 13 inch. I have used the 13 inch since 1986 and the only thing I have done is sharpen knives and added a little gear oil. Bearings are about the only thing that could go wrong so it is not a deal changer for me.

  JDuke I am not you, so I can only respond from my point of view.  Also I am not standing In front of the planner you are talking about. And my other disclaimer is I only change planner knives in the 13 inch maybe once a year. I save the 15 inch for the last cuts and only if I can't get what I want off the 13, so I haven't changed blades in 5 years.

Now I do not plan on ever getting a new machine with an inserted cutter head or changing to inserted cutter heads on either of my jointers or planners. Just not cost effective for me. I am writing because I would rather have a planner with straight knives than no planner at all. And a 15 inch is better than a benchtop 13 inch. Also it is always easier to find what you want if you already have one.

Condition, Cost, need, and availability and what you want, are all factors that inter into a purchase of used machinery. Only you can decide if it is a good deal. But one can loose out on a fine piece of equipment if they get it in their head that they are only going to pay less than half the new price for a piece of equipment. Personally if I couldn't get my asking price I wouldn't sell it.

Tom
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#33
(03-30-2024, 10:48 AM)JDuke Wrote: Tom, I am with you on tools that are still being produced, Generally I feel like somewhere between 50-75% of new is a fair deal depending on what the market is for said tool.

Of course Festool tends to get closer to 75% or above but a used Dewalt I’m probably not going above 50%.

Where I get more conflicted, is something like a Woodtek planer, saw one locally that’s probably over 10 years old, and as you probably know, Woodworkers supply who sold them just went under.  The seller wants $850 for a 15 inch planer, that may be a decent deal, it’s certainly not a screaming deal in my book.  Depending on the condition of the planer, it could also be a horrible deal, especially when you consider parts may not be readily available.  


I am like many woodworkers more interested in a helical head planer and will probably hold out for one, although if I found a good enough deal on a straight knife to make it worth retrofitting it with a helical head, I would do that as well.

I have a Shopfox 15" planer that I picked up new on a sale several years ago directly from Grizzly; has their carbide insert cutterhead. I also have an 8" Shopfox jointer that I also bought new through a local dealer (again on sale at Christmas time, no less) with straight knives when I bought it (less than $1K delivered to the local store). I later installed a Byrd head on it that I bought from Brian in Sunny Florida (Holbren). 

Many years earlier I had bought a Ridgid 13" planer from Home Depot, which has two-sided straight knives and are self-registering. Planed a lot of rough lumber with this planer and still have it but don't use it much anymore.

I haven't heard of anyone who upgraded to the carbide insert cutterheads wanting to go back to straight knives. And not having to fiddle around with setting jointer knives is soooooo much better and more convenient!

If cost is a primary consideration your plan to pick up an otherwise good older planer and replace the cutterhead with a carbide model is a good one IMO. Good luck!
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#34
Crap shoot on used tool market. I found the biggest problem with hunting for a large machine trying to save some money is not having the machine. Hunting may be fun for some, tiring for me. I messed around with jigs & sleds while I hunted for a decent 8" jointer about year. I finally caved in and bought a brand new one. Lesson learned is trying to save 500 bucks or so was a mistake, I cant believe how much easier & faster projects get done. Reason I never bought used was not much out there & if it was a really nice machine price was pretty close to new.
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#35
I was in the same boat on the jointer, finally caught a sale and got a 8" PM wih an insert cutterhead.

Ed
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#36
(04-01-2024, 02:15 PM)tablesawtom Wrote: Yes, RAS are a great bargain today. The old Delta contractors are also a great bargain too. They have a bad rep for going out of alignment but if the trunnion bolts are replaced with grade 5 or 8 bolts it gets rid of bolt stretch and the stays in alignment.

I’ve heard conflicting stories about parts availability for older Delta saws, actually for any of their older power tools. On one hand I’ve heard it’s no harder to find than say parts for an older Rigid table saw, and I’ve also heard that most of their old parts inventory were bought up and destroyed by the “new”, i.e. overseas, Delta owner, as a way to force consumers to have to purchase the newer, more recent models. Seems to be lots of misinformation out there concerning the “old” Delta parts availability in the used tool market.
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